What We Do

Do you only work on issues of Race and LGBTQ inclusion?


Our sweet spots are on issues of Race and LGBTQ diversity, equity and inclusion. However, as we approach these issues through an intersectional lens, it means we extend our work to include other types of characteristics, including but not limited to gender and disability.




What services do you offer?


We support all types of organisations by doing 3 things: provide diversity and inclusion consultancy support, participate in and/or curate events and deliver challenging, impactful workshops on a range of topics. Our services are underpinned by our values and taking a fresh, intersectional approach to this subject. We’re not for the faint-hearted!




What do your workshops involve – and are they remote friendly?


We enjoy working with prospective clients to have a clear sense of your needs, how it connects to your D&I approach and the audience it’s for (we’re not huge fans of ‘off the shelf’ stuff because no organisation is ‘off the shelf’ either). The target audience will leave feeling informed and with tangible actions to support your inclusion efforts. But that’s not all, they are designed with storytelling, empowerment and insights at the heart. You can find more information on our what we do page. And of course, during the Covid-19 pandemic, we’re successfully delivering our workshops online.




Are you on social media?


Yes, find us on LinkedIn where we share regular content from within the diversity and inclusion space to keep you connected to the latest thinking and our unique perspective. You can also find us on Instagram and Twitter where we share inspiring life stories of Queer People of Colour (QPoC) and have more in-depth conversations with diverse communities.




Are you open to partnerships?


Absolutely! If you feel equally passionate about our mission to empower queer people of colour, through societal change, and think we can accelerate that revolution by working together, please get in touch.




I’d like to get involved/work with colourfull – what’s the next step?


Great! We’d love to hear from you. Whether you’d like to find out more about our services, collaborate or feature in our next Life Story, email us or drop us a message and let’s start a conversation.





Inclusion is not bringing people into what already exists; it is making a new space, a better space for everyone.

 

~ George Dei

Diversity, Equity & Inclusion

How is equity different to equality?


Equity requires us to acknowledge that not everyone starts on a level playing field, at the same starting point in life. Systemic inequality and discrimination have created barriers for certain groups of people in society. We need to redress this to ensure equality (not unfair advantage).




What do diversity, inclusion and equity mean?


A short, snappy answer won’t do this justice – but we’ll give it a go. Diversity equals variety, the variety of backgrounds and characteristics that make the world an interesting place. Inclusion is about creating environments where all people feel welcome and valued, as equals. Equity is about redesigning policies and practices and putting in place the required support for marginalised groups so they have equal access to opportunities e.g. removing names from CVs to level the playing field.




What is intersectionality?


Intersectionality is a term coined by Prof. Kimberlé Crenshaw (1989) and is rooted in examining oppression. Basically, it looks at the complex and cumulative ways in which discrimination can overlap and affect people. Crenshaw’s work examined the experiences of Black women (race, gender) but it has since been extended to look at other facets of identity such as disability, sexuality and class. So, for example, the lived experiences of being both Black and gay as opposed to being White and gay will mean there are unique challenges faced because of racism and homophobia. It’s these intersections that better help us understand what leads to exclusion – and make inclusion a reality.




Why is intersectionality important in the workplace – and outside of it?


Our Founder, Dee, contributed to an article on the importance of understanding intersectionality in the workplace. If we really want to create inclusion, we need to understand where exclusion exists and how it manifests itself – to the question above, it affects certain groups of people in unique ways. In the absence of understanding it, you’ll hinder your efforts and those who are marginalised are likely to have daily interactions that will accumulate emotional tax that can affect how they think, feel and act both at work and home.




What are the benefits of diversity and inclusion?


There is so much research out there that speaks to the benefits of investing in D&I. There are 3 distinct buckets: a healthy culture and engaged employees, improved organisational performance and tapping into new markets and spending power. I could go on and on, but a quick Google will help you see the various studies that evidence the good stuff – you just have to be prepared to put in the hard work.




How does diversity and inclusion drive employee engagement?


Think about it this way, if you were able to be your full, authentic self at work with no fear – and work in a place where your truly felt seen, heard and valued, how would you feel? It’s likely you’ll feel loyal, work a little bit harder because you care and be a positive ambassador. Now imagine everyone in your organisation feeling this way, full of creativity and innovation where people get to do their best work with no distractions. It’s pretty easy to see how it can drive engagement, productivity and performance.




What’s colourfull’s approach to creating inclusion?


We listen to your challenges, share our learnings and use data to arm you with knowledge and actionable insights to build a workplace where everyone is empowered to create inclusion.





When individuals feel included they are more likely to be innovative and team-orientated and more likely to stay in the company.

~ Catalyst, 2018

LGBTQ Inclusion

How is equity different to equality?


Equity requires us to acknowledge that not everyone starts on a level playing field, at the same starting point in life. Systemic inequality and discrimination have created barriers for certain groups of people in society. We need to redress this to ensure equality (not unfair advantage).




What do diversity, inclusion and equity mean?


A short, snappy answer won’t do this justice – but we’ll give it a go. Diversity equals variety, the variety of backgrounds and characteristics that make the world an interesting place. Inclusion is about creating environments where all people feel welcome and valued, as equals. Equity is about redesigning policies and practices and putting in place the required support for marginalised groups so they have equal access to opportunities e.g. removing names from CVs to level the playing field.




What is intersectionality?


Intersectionality is a term coined by Prof. Kimberlé Crenshaw (1989) and is rooted in examining oppression. Basically, it looks at the complex and cumulative ways in which discrimination can overlap and affect people. Crenshaw’s work examined the experiences of Black women (race, gender) but it has since been extended to look at other facets of identity such as disability, sexuality and class. So, for example, the lived experiences of being both Black and gay as opposed to being White and gay will mean there are unique challenges faced because of racism and homophobia. It’s these intersections that better help us understand what leads to exclusion – and make inclusion a reality.




Why is intersectionality important in the workplace – and outside of it?


Our Founder, Dee, contributed to an article on the importance of understanding intersectionality in the workplace. If we really want to create inclusion, we need to understand where exclusion exists and how it manifests itself – to the question above, it affects certain groups of people in unique ways. In the absence of understanding it, you’ll hinder your efforts and those who are marginalised are likely to have daily interactions that will accumulate emotional tax that can affect how they think, feel and act both at work and home.




What are the benefits of diversity and inclusion?


There is so much research out there that speaks to the benefits of investing in D&I. There are 3 distinct buckets: a healthy culture and engaged employees, improved organisational performance and tapping into new markets and spending power. I could go on and on, but a quick Google will help you see the various studies that evidence the good stuff – you just have to be prepared to put in the hard work.




How does diversity and inclusion drive employee engagement?


Think about it this way, if you were able to be your full, authentic self at work with no fear – and work in a place where your truly felt seen, heard and valued, how would you feel? It’s likely you’ll feel loyal, work a little bit harder because you care and be a positive ambassador. Now imagine everyone in your organisation feeling this way, full of creativity and innovation where people get to do their best work with no distractions. It’s pretty easy to see how it can drive engagement, productivity and performance.




What’s colourfull’s approach to creating inclusion?


We listen to your challenges, share our learnings and use data to arm you with knowledge and actionable insights to build a workplace where everyone is empowered to create inclusion.





76% of Gen Z identify as heterosexual, and only about half (54%) say they are exclusively attracted to the opposite sex. 

 

~ Ipsos, June 2020

Race & Ethnic Minority Inclusion

Do you only work on issues of Race and LGBTQ inclusion?


Our sweet spots are on issues of Race and LGBTQ diversity, equity and inclusion. However, as we approach these issues through an intersectional lens, it means we extend our work to include other types of characteristics, including but not limited to gender and disability.




What services do you offer?


We support all types of organisations by doing 3 things: provide diversity and inclusion consultancy support, participate in and/or curate events and deliver challenging, impactful workshops on a range of topics. Our services are underpinned by our values and taking a fresh, intersectional approach to this subject. We’re not for the faint-hearted!




What do your workshops involve – and are they remote friendly?


We enjoy working with prospective clients to have a clear sense of your needs, how it connects to your D&I approach and the audience it’s for (we’re not huge fans of ‘off the shelf’ stuff because no organisation is ‘off the shelf’ either). The target audience will leave feeling informed and with tangible actions to support your inclusion efforts. But that’s not all, they are designed with storytelling, empowerment and insights at the heart. You can find more information on our what we do page. And of course, during the Covid-19 pandemic, we’re successfully delivering our workshops online.




Are you on social media?


Yes, find us on LinkedIn where we share regular content from within the diversity and inclusion space to keep you connected to the latest thinking and our unique perspective. You can also find us on Instagram and Twitter where we share inspiring life stories of Queer People of Colour (QPoC) and have more in-depth conversations with diverse communities.




Are you open to partnerships?


Absolutely! If you feel equally passionate about our mission to empower queer people of colour, through societal change, and think we can accelerate that revolution by working together, please get in touch.




I’d like to get involved/work with colourfull – what’s the next step?


Great! We’d love to hear from you. Whether you’d like to find out more about our services, collaborate or feature in our next Life Story, email us or drop us a message and let’s start a conversation.





Minority ethnic applicants and white applicants with non-English names have to send on average 60 per cent more applications to get a positive response from an employer than a white person of British origin.

 

~ Raconteur, 2019