What We Do

Do you only work on issues of Race and LGBTQ inclusion?


Our sweet spots are on issues of Race and LGBTQ diversity, equity and inclusion. However, as we approach these issues through an intersectional lens, it means we extend our work to include other types of characteristics, including but not limited to gender and disability.




What services do you offer?


We support all types of organisations by doing 3 things: provide diversity and inclusion consultancy support, participate in and/or curate events and deliver challenging, impactful workshops on a range of topics. Our services are underpinned by our values and taking a fresh, intersectional approach to this subject. We’re not for the faint-hearted!




What do your workshops involve – and are they remote friendly?


We enjoy working with prospective clients to have a clear sense of your needs, how it connects to your D&I approach and the audience it’s for (we’re not huge fans of ‘off the shelf’ stuff because no organisation is ‘off the shelf’ either). The target audience will leave feeling informed and with tangible actions to support your inclusion efforts. But that’s not all, they are designed with storytelling, empowerment and insights at the heart. You can find more information on our what we do page. And of course, during the Covid-19 pandemic, we’re successfully delivering our workshops online.




Are you on social media?


Yes, find us on LinkedIn where we share regular content from within the diversity and inclusion space to keep you connected to the latest thinking and our unique perspective. You can also find us on Instagram and Twitter where we share inspiring life stories of Queer People of Colour (QPoC) and have more in-depth conversations with diverse communities.




Are you open to partnerships?


Absolutely! If you feel equally passionate about our mission to empower queer people of colour, through societal change, and think we can accelerate that revolution by working together, please get in touch.




I’d like to get involved/work with colourfull – what’s the next step?


Great! We’d love to hear from you. Whether you’d like to find out more about our services, collaborate or feature in our next Life Story, email us or drop us a message and let’s start a conversation.





Inclusion is not bringing people into what already exists; it is making a new space, a better space for everyone.

 

~ George Dei

Diversity, Equity & Inclusion

What does BAME and PoC stand for?


BAME (Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic) and PoC (person/people of colour) are acronyms used to reference people from different ethnic backgrounds. Both terms are often used to reference people who are not White. However, they can both be seen as problematic as the terms reduce large groups of people, with different ethnic experiences, into one group and therefore 'others' those who are not White. There is no right or wrong, the key is to simply ask what terms your colleagues prefer.




What’s the right term BAME or PoC?


At colourfull we prefer PoC as it leads with the person, rather than their characteristics. We use this language for other groups too e.g. person of faith, person with a disability. Ultimately, all this work is about people, so it feels aligned with our philosophy and approach to this work. But even we make sure we check when speaking directly to these communities! As mentioned above, PoC is still a catch-all term. For example, Black and Brown people will have very different experiences of structural racism and societal barriers. And even within races, one Asian person may have different experiences to another Asian person from a different country.




What are the barriers for PoC in the workplace?


Just like the LGBTQ community (see above), PoC face many barriers in the workplace. The first of which can be simply getting shortlisted for a job if their names don’t sound White British. Other barriers can include not being listened to or credited with their ideas, getting promoted and making it to senior leadership positions. These are underpinned by individuals factors (stereotypes, microaggressions) and institutional factors (policies, processes).




What is anti-racism?


Anti-racism is a verb and something we practice by taking action to combat all types of racism to create racial equity. It is really important for Black people, PoC and allies to work together to break down barriers and structures held in place through power and privilege – which typically sits with White people in the context of race.




What does the term ‘White privilege’ mean?


White privilege is the advantage of being White in society. It doesn’t mean someone is privileged (it’s often confused with class and wealth). It doesn’t mean that if you’re white you haven’t struggled, it just means that you haven’t come up against other barriers or faced certain prejudices because of your skin colour. Recognising all the aspects of White privilege is a great step towards being an ally and practising anti-racism.




How can I be anti-racist and an ally to Black people and PoC?


It can be uncomfortable but keep reading, learning and practising being anti-racist. You can use your privilege to call out racism when you see it. This specifically extends to White people and non-Black PoC. In the workplace, listen to your colleagues and amplify their voices but don’t rely on them to educate you about their lived experiences. Share what you’ve learnt, challenge racist behaviour and work through any discomfort you may experience – it’s totally normal, but don’t let that get in the way of reflection and unlearning. You can follow colourfull on our social channels to stay connected to our perspective and latest thinking.





When individuals feel included they are more likely to be innovative and team-orientated and more likely to stay in the company.

~ Catalyst, 2018

LGBTQ Inclusion

What does LGBTQ stand for?


Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and/or Questioning. This acronym is commonly used to identify and group people who don’t identify as heterosexual. You may also see the community referred to as LGBT, LGBTQIA (including people who identify as Intersex and Asexual/Agender/Ally). As identities evolve, so have the acronyms, LGBTQ+ or LGBTQIA+ both include the many additional experiences and identities through the plus symbol.




What are the common issues that LGBTQ people face in the workplace?


LGBTQ people can be the subject of unconscious bias, showing up as stereotyping, discrimination and microagressions at work. These challenges can affect their well-being and careers, from navigating safety and coming out, to retention and engagement.




Why is LGBTQ representation so important?


LGBTQ representation is important on many levels. People work best (and are happiest) when they can be their authentic selves. Building representation throughout workplaces and in mainstream media reduces stereotypes and helps create a space where these identities are destigmatised, allowing people to be themselves and begin to thrive.




What can I do to support LGBTQ people in my workplace?


There is so much you can do to support colleagues at work as an ally. From learning about issues LGBTQ people come up against on a daily basis, to introducing inclusive policies, involvement with employee resource groups to holding your leadership teams to account on inclusion – there is plenty. As Jameela Jamil often says, aim for “progress, not perfection”.




What are the benefits of LGBTQ inclusion?


As mentioned above, creating an inclusive environment in general has many benefits for a business and employees. For your LGBTQ colleagues, it will create a place where they feel safe and respected, want to stay and can do their best work. It will also encourage the best talent from the LGBTQ community to want to join you.





76% of Gen Z identify as heterosexual, and only about half (54%) say they are exclusively attracted to the opposite sex. 

 

~ Ipsos, June 2020

Race & Ethnic Minority Inclusion

What does BAME and PoC stand for?


BAME (Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic) and PoC (person/people of colour) are acronyms used to reference people from different ethnic backgrounds. Both terms are often used to reference people who are not White. However, they can both be seen as problematic as the terms reduce large groups of people, with different ethnic experiences, into one group and therefore 'others' those who are not White. There is no right or wrong, the key is to simply ask what terms your colleagues prefer.




What’s the right term BAME or PoC?


At colourfull we prefer PoC as it leads with the person, rather than their characteristics. We use this language for other groups too e.g. person of faith, person with a disability. Ultimately, all this work is about people, so it feels aligned with our philosophy and approach to this work. But even we make sure we check when speaking directly to these communities! As mentioned above, PoC is still a catch-all term. For example, Black and Brown people will have very different experiences of structural racism and societal barriers. And even within races, one Asian person may have different experiences to another Asian person from a different country.




What are the barriers for PoC in the workplace?


Just like the LGBTQ community (see above), PoC face many barriers in the workplace. The first of which can be simply getting shortlisted for a job if their names don’t sound White British. Other barriers can include not being listened to or credited with their ideas, getting promoted and making it to senior leadership positions. These are underpinned by individuals factors (stereotypes, microaggressions) and institutional factors (policies, processes).




What is anti-racism?


Anti-racism is a verb and something we practice by taking action to combat all types of racism to create racial equity. It is really important for Black people, PoC and allies to work together to break down barriers and structures held in place through power and privilege – which typically sits with White people in the context of race.




What does the term ‘White privilege’ mean?


White privilege is the advantage of being White in society. It doesn’t mean someone is privileged (it’s often confused with class and wealth). It doesn’t mean that if you’re white you haven’t struggled, it just means that you haven’t come up against other barriers or faced certain prejudices because of your skin colour. Recognising all the aspects of White privilege is a great step towards being an ally and practising anti-racism.




How can I be anti-racist and an ally to Black people and PoC?


It can be uncomfortable but keep reading, learning and practising being anti-racist. You can use your privilege to call out racism when you see it. This specifically extends to White people and non-Black PoC. In the workplace, listen to your colleagues and amplify their voices but don’t rely on them to educate you about their lived experiences. Share what you’ve learnt, challenge racist behaviour and work through any discomfort you may experience – it’s totally normal, but don’t let that get in the way of reflection and unlearning. You can follow colourfull on our social channels to stay connected to our perspective and latest thinking.





Minority ethnic applicants and white applicants with non-English names have to send on average 60 per cent more applications to get a positive response from an employer than a white person of British origin.

 

~ Raconteur, 2019